Tag Archives: alive

Participatory Storytelling at Alive Medical Services

Alive Medical Services is launching a new participatory storytelling project to break down stigma and open up conversation around HIV: Positive. Powerful. Alive.

By engaging clients this project, we will provide program participants with a platform to tell their stories from a lens of strength. Through storytelling, video, and photography, clients will show their communities that they aren’t victims – they’re fighters. And they have stories to tell.

We have secured a partnership with a local video company, SkyRock Productions, that has agreed to train our clients on storytelling, video, and photography. However, we still need simple photo or video devices our clients can film their stories with.

That being said, we are looking for partners equally as interested in the power of arts, storytelling, and the end of HIV-related stigma to make this project a reality.

Our clients’ narratives will help reshape the way HIV is viewed in Namuwongo, Kampala, and beyond. Please consider donating to this project at https://goo.gl/8X1syD.

If you are interested in being involved in this project, reach out to Alive Medical Services’ communications department at emiolene@amsuganda.org.

Children’s Day at Alive Medical Services

On December 2, 2017, 100 children gathered at Alive Medical Services for Children’s Day.

“Even though they’re children, they still experience stress,” said Lorna, a counselor with AMS’ youth and children program. “Children’s Day gives them a chance to be free and have fun together. They can forget their troubles for a little while.”

Throughout the day, youth peer educators led children in a number of different activities. They sang, danced, and played games, sometimes with their caregivers, other times with their peers.

The youth educators talked to children about the importance of adhering to their medication, along with other child-friendly health topics.

“Our youth educators really take charge of these events,” Lorna said. “They serve as good role models for the children, and encourage them to stay healthy.”

As children interacted with youth educators and staff, their caregivers participated in their own type of programming: music therapy. Our music therapy program was recently relaunched by two new members of our staff, both of whom arrived two weeks ago from the United Kingdom. These two staff members, Ella and Isabel, engaged caregivers in music therapy sessions throughout the day.

While in these sessions, caregivers were given the chance to unwind, share stories, and enjoy each other’s company. They talked about motherhood, care, and HIV, connecting over the challenges (and of course, the benefits) of raising HIV-positive children.

“A great part of today is the fact that children get to share love with their parents,” said Martin, a clinician at AMS. “We encourage children to dance, sing and spend time together, which is so important.”

 

Alive Medical Services Celebrates World AIDS Day!

An AMS clinician counsels a client before they are tested for HIV at our Galaxy FM outreach.

On December 1, communities around the world came together to recognize World AIDS Day.

World AIDS Day was created to honor those we’ve lost, celebrate the progress we’ve made, and reinvigorate the fight for an HIV-free generation. Alive Medical Services recognized the event through a number of different initiatives, including three major outreaches, a month-long campaign with Galaxy FM, appearances on television and radio, and the launch of a donation box drive.

Starting in November, AMS teamed up with Galaxy FM to raise awareness around HIV. Every day, these messages were aired three times, and each week, we focused on a different theme. After discussing the importance of adherence, overcoming stigma as an HIV-positive youth, and staying healthy in a discordant relationship, the campaign culminated in a call to action, which encouraged listeners to get tested for HIV.

This radio campaign reached 10 million people, not only in Kampala, but in Entebbe, Wakiso, Jinja, Mpigi, Luwero, and several other areas.

On World AIDS Day, Alive Medical Services set up an outreach at Galaxy FM headquarters in Kansanga. We tested over 150 individuals for HIV, providing them with counselling services before and after their tests and linking those who tested positive to care.

A clinician speaks with a client before they get tested at our Galaxy FM outreach.

A patient smiles after getting tested for HIV at our Galaxy FM outreach.

On the same day, AMS held another outreach at Total Uganda’s head office in Namuwongo, where we tested over 65 of Total’s employees. Prior to the testing, an AMS doctor, counsellor and patient engaged in a panel discussion about dealing with HIV at home. They also discussed the importance of men getting tested and treated for HIV, as oftentimes, stigma, work hours, and a lack of awareness stop men from visiting the clinic.

Later that afternoon, an AMS doctor gave a health talk to 200 people from key populations.

AMS and Total staff pose for a group photo after the outreach at Total headquarters.

Leading up to World AIDS Day, we worked to spread health messages through radio and television. Almost every day, we had a different member of our staff on air, appearing on X FM, Galaxy FM, NTV, Capital FM, and Urban TV.

On Monday, an AMS doctor discussed HIV and access to health care; on Tuesday, two of our youth clients talked about stigma, and the challenges of growing up with HIV. On Wednesday, an AMS counsellor and a youth patient delved into the difficulty of adhering to medication while at boarding school, and provided suggestions for teachers and school administrators to better support their HIV positive students.

The weekend was also filled with a flurry of activity: AMS delivered donation boxes to 10 new partners, all of whom will be collecting donations for AMS throughout the month of December. Recognizing that many of our clients are struggling to lift their families out of poverty – and thus, have difficulty paying for their children’s school fees – we will use their donations to build a library for the HIV-positive children in our care.

Our partners for the donation box drive include Goodlife Pharmacy, BBROOD Uganda, Aristoc Bookstore, and Guardian Health, among many others. Donation boxes can be found throughout Kampala at 20 different locations. *

We also had three more radio and television appearances over the weekend, including a question and answer session led by an AMS doctor, a brief on water purification, and a discussion on mother-to-child transmission of HIV and updates in children’s antiretroviral medication.

One of our donation boxes inside Aristoc Booklex.

NTV captures a water purification demonstration at Alive Medical Services.

 

A pharmacist at Alive Medical Services talks about pellets, a newly introduced antiretroviral treatment for children, on NTV,

* Visit any of our partners’ stores to donate to Alive Medical Services’ library project. Our full list of partners include: Guardian Health, Café Kawa, Epiphania Pharmacy, Embassy Supermarket, C&A Pharmacy, Goodlife Pharmacy, Aristoc Booklex, Café Pap, Friecca Pharmacy, and BBROOD Uganda. Donation boxes can be found at the front of each of our partners’ stores!

“I will not die before you do” Peace’s Story of Survival

Peace’s mother sold her and smiled.

“You don’t belong to anyone,” she said, looking down at the girl as she was forced to take off her clothes. Peace wrapped a red piece of cloth around her waist, not understanding where her mother was going, or why she had taken her here. Children peered out at her from behind the legs of adults, fear etched into every one of their faces.

“You’re going to die here,” her mother said.

Peace was just 7 years old. But in her head, she silently spoke her response.

Trust me, Mommy, she said. I will not die before you do. 

Childhood

This woman was not Peace’s mother. But when she first found Peace sleeping on the streets of Rakai, that’s exactly who she said she was. The woman cleaned Peace up, fed her dinner, and made her feel comfortable in her home, a large house far from the village 5-year-old Peace had initially fled.

“From this day forward, I am your mother,” the woman said. “You don’t have to worry anymore.”

Peace never knew her biological mother, but her last adopted family had forced her to sleep on the cold, hard ground outside their house. Peace’s new mother sent her to boarding school.

Though Peace was thrilled to go to school, she was anxious to see her mother again. She hadn’t been feeling well, and she was worried it was related to the fact that she wasn’t taking her medication anymore. Peace didn’t know what the medicine was for, but for as long as she could remember, the medicine had made her feel better. At her last home, Peace had been forced to clean the house, wash clothes, and scavenge for food — but she did swallow pills every day.

The holidays grew nearer, and returning home consumed the young girl’s thoughts.

“As time went on, I found out that my mother tried to pay the teachers to keep me at school,” Peace said. “But they kept telling her: you need to pick up your girl. Finally, she did.”

Back in Rakai, Peace’s reunion with her mother was short-lived. The woman left her with some food and water, and told Peace she’d be back in a week. When the woman’s husband found Peace at the house unaccompanied, he threw her out of the house, threatening to kill her when Peace tried to explain that the woman — his wife — was her mother.

Peace had no choice but to go back to the streets. For weeks, she shuffled from empty building to empty building to find somewhere to live, doing everything she could to get enough food to survive. Despite the last encounter she had with the woman’s husband, she felt like she had no choice. She went back to the large house  to ask for help.

Once she got there, Peace collapsed into the woman’s arms. Her husband wasn’t home, but he would be returning, she said. The woman dried Peace’s tears and held her close.

“Don’t cry,” the woman said. “I’m taking you to live with my sister.”

The woman brought Peace into a forest, claiming her sister had a large house of her own just a short distance away. The woman forced Peace to walk for hours, pressing her to continue until they finally reached a clearing in the woods.

The area was filled with dilapidated thatched huts. Peace had no idea where she was, or more alarming, why a wealthy woman’s sister would live in the depths of the forest. Her questions wouldn’t be answered until days later, when another young girl dressed in crimson explained where they were — and what they were doing there.

Before long, the woman was walking toward home with a money-filled envelope.

Peace was walking toward death in a child sacrifice camp.

Transitions

Today, Peace is 18 years old. Peace is a survivor — not only of poverty, violence, homelessness, and attempted murder, but also, of HIV.

After three months of trauma, Peace escaped the child sacrifice camp and boarded a taxi to Kampala. Weak and undernourished, she was soon back on the streets. She was rounded up with a group of other street children and sent to live in a police cell. When no one came to pick her up, Peace spent three years in a children’s prison.

Every day that passed, Peace’s health deteriorated more. Peace hadn’t committed a crime, but she also didn’t have a home. Without anyone to care for her, she remained in prison until she was adopted once more at the age of 11.

By that time, Peace had been without her medication (which, she later found out, was HIV treatment) for more than six years.

“The doctors thought I had brain damage because I was so sick,” Peace said. “I was finally adopted into a real, kind family, and my mother brought me to see Dr. Pasquine.”

AMS doctors tested Peace for HIV. When she tested positive, they started her on antiretroviral treatment. Thought her parents told Peace that the medicine would keep her healthy and strong, she didn’t realize she was HIV positive until her parents disclosed to her at the age of 13.

“I was terrified,” Peace said. “I had already gone through so many things. You wouldn’t even know I could speak because I was so quiet, I refused to talk.”

Peace became unconsolable. Unwilling to accept her diagnose, she stopped taking her medication. Peace’s parents brought her back to AMS for counseling, and while she was there, the staff introduced Peace to the Victor’s Club, AMS’ program and peer support group for youth living with HIV.

After interacting with doctors, counselors, and her HIV-positive peers, Peace realized her life was far from over. She kept returning to AMS for Victor’s Club meetings and treatment, and slowly, she began to open up. She started talking not only about her past memories, but her future fears.

Finally, Peace said, she had found a place where she could just be herself.

Today

“I never had friends before Victor’s Club,” Peace said. “Once I started coming, things really changed. Now, I’m so social — everyone here knows me.”

Today, Peace counsels younger children involved in Victor’s Club and organizes meetings for her peers. She feels stigma free, she said, and openly shows her medication to anyone who asks about it.

Though Peace’s family has moved to Entebbe, she continues to come to AMS for Victor’s Club meetings, treatment and medication, and other AMS initiatives, such as last year’s music therapy program. Over the summer, Peace was trained at AMS to become a youth peer educator. At this training, she acquired the skills to help HIV positive children and adolescents in her community, and has since helped a number of HIV positive youth in Entebbe find clinics close to their home.

“I love being involved because I am one of them,” Peace said, speaking about the other HIV positive youth in the Victor’s Club. “I used to be like them, refusing to take the drugs. Now, I am healthy. I can help them.”

Peace is now studying counseling at her university. After graduation, she wants to become a minister, spreading messages of love, health , and hope not just in Uganda, but around the world.

“Having HIV is not my fault,” Peace said. “There’s nothing to be done about it. You have to accept the life you were given, and move on.”

Today’s the Day: #GivingTuesday!

Today’s the day: #GivingTuesday!

 

Starting at 8:01 a.m. Uganda time (and 12:01 am Eastern Standard Time) every donation you make toward Alive Medical Services will help us gain additional funding from Global Giving – and every recurring gift you make will be matched 100%!

Starting today, each donation we receive from partners like you will go toward our work with women and children, helping those disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic live healthy, dignified lives. With your support, we’ll reach sisters, mothers, wives, daughters, and friends, many of whom have nowhere else to turn.

Why Women and Children?

Across the country, the rate of HIV among Ugandan women is higher than the rate of HIV among Ugandan men. Young women and adolescent girls are particularly affected by the epidemic, often times due to gender-based violence, sexual coercion and a lack of sexual and reproductive health information.

To truly end the spread of HIV, we must reach those most vulnerable to it. By supporting women who have already contracted the virus, we can not only save their lives, but stop HIV from spreading to their children.

Your #GivingTuesday contributions will help AMS:

  • Help women plan for the future by providing safe, effective family planning methods for those who want to space or delay pregnancy
  • Ensure safe deliveries by providing pregnant women with antenatal care
  • Prevent mother-to-child-transmission of HIV by counselling pregnant mothers and helping them adhere to their medication
  • Track the health status of babies born to HIV positive mothers, and provide families with the support they need to ensure their infants’ well-being
  • Engage young people in a diverse array of youth-centered programming, including peer support groups, counselling, music therapy, and more
  • Provide a platform for adolescents to draw support from one another, boost their confidence, learn practical skills, and educate their peers on health-seeking behaviors
  • And more!

How do I donate?

Visit Alive Medical Services’ Global Giving page to make an impact today! Click here to donate.

A Single Father’s Story of Love and Loss

Henry and his son, Richard, sit next to each other after Henry’s appointment at Alive Medical Services.

Henry’s wife passed away 25 years ago, but looking at him now, you’d think it happened yesterday. His body stiffens as he talks about her, pausing every so often to extract himself from the memories passing through his head.

“We didn’t know until it was too late,” Henry said. “And after she passed, everything changed.”

Back in 1993, Henry had barely realized what happened until his wife was gone. Henry contracted HIV from another partner and unknowingly passed it along to his wife. After she died, Henry was left to care for four children and his elderly mother, all the while battling HIV himself.

At the time, HIV was severely stigmatized in his community, making it difficult for Henry to openly seek help and treatment.

Henry would walk from health clinic to health clinic attempting to find antiretroviral medication. More often than not, he’d reach the pharmacy counter just to be turned away. It seemed that there were never enough antiretrovirals for everyone suffering, causing Henry’s health – and the wellbeing of his family – to drastically decline.

“I was so depressed during those years,” Henry said. “It was hard to get medication, and it was frustrating to have nowhere to go for help.”

Poor health, guilt and depression began to consume Henry, making it nearly impossible to work, feed his family, and gather the strength to keep on living. When he and his youngest son, Richard, came down with tuberculosis, they could barely afford the medication they needed to stay alive.

Eventually, a friend referred Henry to Alive Medical Services, a small clinic that had just opened up near Henry’s house. He has remained an active client ever since, returning again and again for treatment over the last 10 years.

“Without Alive, I wouldn’t have made it,” Henry said. “I’m healthier now than I’ve ever been, not just because I get free ARVs, but because I get free treatment of opportunistic infections too.”

After his health stabilized, Henry was able to recommit himself to his children, all of whom are HIV negative. Henry worked constantly to earn enough money for school fees. Because of that, his first three children now have families of their own – and his youngest son, Richard, just recently finished his degree. Richard now works as an electrician, and routinely accompanies his father to the clinic for check-ups.

“The counsellors at Alive helped me be strong for my children,” Henry said. “For any single fathers dealing with the same situation, I’d tell them this: push hard for your children.”

Thinking of his past, Henry recognized that often, men avoid HIV clinics. They don’t want to be seen there, he said, but they need to be more open to the idea.

“There’s nothing wrong with getting tested and treated,” Henry said. “It keeps you alive. Today, I’m proud to tell my story and show people how I’ve survived.”