In Testimonies of Love,Uncategorized

My Journey with Alive Medical Services

By Francis Musasizi

I was born into a family of three children: my sister, the oldest, and my brother, next in line. I was the last to be born, and we were all raised by our mother, a single parent.

I’ve been living with this epidemic since the day I was born. For the past 21 years, I’ve experienced real ups and downs because of HIV. For years, I had no idea I was HIV-positive: my mom had not disclosed to me, fearing that the status would worry me. All the same, I remember taking one tablet at 6 a.m. every day – and because I was thin, I faced all kinds of bullies at school.

As the years went by, my mom and I were introduced to Alive Medical Services. I met a loving lady named Dr Pasquine, the director of AMS, who welcomed me into the clinic with all her heart. I was then introduced to Lorna, the head of the Youth Wing.

Since then, Lorna has played a big role in my life; she introduced me to a group of youths who were like me. The youths were a part of the Victor’s Club, AMS’ group for HIV-positive youth. We would chill together, have fun, and entertain ourselves. Finally, I knew I was in a safe place, and AMS became my second home.

By that time, my mom still hadn’t disclosed to me. I was in that curiosity stage of life, where I would ask my mom a series of questions.

“Why am I taking this pill every day?” I would ask. Eventually, she told me the truth, and explained how important that pill was to my life.

When she told me I was HIV-positive, I was shocked. I wondered how I would keep swallowing this pill, every single day, for the rest of my life. With the help of my fellow youths at AMS – and the awesome counsellors who had my back – I realized it was possible.

Even so, returning to school after discovering my status was difficult. I was terrified of how others would think of me. At times, I would skip my medicines. And sometimes, I would go through moments when I started to give up the fight. I became quiet at school, as I didn’t want to share anything with my peers; I started viewing my status as an impediment to my academic performance. However, every time I would feel down, I would call one of the counsellors at AMS.

A few years later, a community music leadership training program came to AMS. The program was launched in partnership with Musicians Without Borders (MwB), the goal of which was to use music to fight stigma. Along with 28 other youth, I went through a series of training at the clinic with MwB. At the end of the program, we were awarded certificates and became community music leaders.

Our newfound knowledge enabled us to provide music training during youth days, children’s days, and additional days during the week, something I’ve been involved with ever since. We would gather with children and lead music sessions, so by the time the client saw a doctor, they would have participated in our session. These sessions had a big impact on clients’ health, as many of their viral loads became suppressed after participating.

After the community music leadership training program, I started believing in myself. I knew I had nothing to change regarding my status, so I embraced it. I accomplished this with the help of my fellow youths at AMS, who always visited and backed me up when I felt down.

My message to all the youths and adolescents living with HIV out there is not to give up on your dreams. We also have bigger dreams to chase, just like any HIV negative person, and we shouldn’t lose hope. We can make it to the stars and beyond if we adhere to our prescriptions and exercise positive living.

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