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Meet George, Head of Nutrition at Alive Medical Services

Growing up, George knew he wanted to be a doctor. He was good at math and biology, and he idolized his uncle, a well-known doctor in his Lira community.

“My uncle had a passion for his patients, and I respected that,” George said. “I wanted to learn to do what he did – so I studied clinical medicine, community health and public health.”

After finishing his studies, George got a job with Medicines Sans Frontiers (MSF) in Northern Uganda. He was stationed in Lira and Kitgum, where he worked with children in two therapeutic feeding centres that served as referral points for health facilities throughout the region. He had studied malnutrition and its effects at university, but seeing such issues in person changed the course of George’s life.

After two years with MSF, George moved to Kampala to continue his studies at the International Health Sciences University. Right down the road, Alive Medical Services (AMS) was growing at a rapid pace. Though only in existence for three years, word about the small clinic was spreading.

“One thing I noticed immediately was the teamwork,” said George, speaking of his impressions after first visiting AMS. “Seven years later, that teamwork is one of the major reasons I continue to work hard today.”

Eventually, a spot opened up at AMS. George took it, and immediately, he began noticing an all-too-common trend, something he had seen regularly in the refugee camps in the north. Many of his HIV positive clients were malnourished, running the risk of never getting better due to lack of food.

“Good nutrition and antiretroviral treatment reinforce each other,” George said. “When a client is taking ARVs but not eating well, they’ll never get better.”

George took it upon himself to expand AMS’ nutrition programming. Every quarter, AMS now screens more than 5,000 clients for malnutrition. Twice a month, we provide packages of rice, beans, sugar and vegetables to thousands of families in food crisis.

In 2014, George took over AMS’ budding gardening program, which trains HIV positive clients to grow healthy food in their own neighbourhoods. George began training multiple groups of clients from across Central Uganda, including patients in Kampala, Mukono, Kapeeka and beyond. Today, there are 18 established gardening groups of AMS clients, all of whom cultivate produce for subsistence and sale.

To strengthen his knowledge of nutrition even further, recently, George went back to school to receive a master’s degree in human nutrition. He has continued to work full-time at AMS, helping clients better understand the value of nutrition through counselling, nutrition check-ups, and health talks.

“Nutrition is critical for people managing HIV,” George said. “We can’t leave it behind.”